Our Team 

What is a Board Certified Behaviour Analyst (BCBA)? 

A Board Certified Behaviour Analyst is a highly specialized, graduate-level certification in behaviour analysis. BCBAs must follow a code of ethics and standards and are required to recertify.


What is the difference between an Occupational Therapist, a Speech and Language Therapist, a Physiotherapist, an Instructor Therapist and a Social Worker?

Instructor Therapist

Communication, relationships, language and social situations – these are just a few of the barriers children with autism face. KidsAbility’s BCBAs design customized therapy plans that become the roadmap that guide our Instructor Therapists as they work with children to break down these barriers helping families experience many firsts – from speaking and expressing their thoughts for the first time to families being able to participate in community activities together.

Types of Challenges, Therapies & Goals:  

  • Behaviours
  • Social situations
  • Relationships
  • Communication
  • Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA)


Occupational Therapist

At KidsAbility, so many of the children we see have difficulty getting dressed, eating, brushing their teeth, tying their shoes or venturing out into the world. Everyday activities are a struggle that need to be overcome. Working with our occupational therapists, children learn to perform those everyday activities that are meaningful to them. We call it “occupational” therapy, as the therapy focuses on “all the jobs” of living and can help improve a child’s cognitive, physical and motor skills and enhance their self-esteem and participation. Whether its play, school or life skills, they are all equally important in maximizing a child’s potential and living a fulfilled life.

Types of Challenges, Therapies & Goals:

  • Fine and gross motor skills challenges (holding/controlling a pencil or scissors, eye-hand coordination, movement planning, posture control, etc.)
  • Self-care (feeding, dressing, hygiene, toileting, sleeping, etc.)
  • Play (sharing, interaction with peers, functional play, etc.
  • Sensory processing disorders (sensory reactions which impacts attention, behaviour and learning)


Physiotherapist

Many of the children we see have difficulty with learning how to move i.e. crawling, cruising, walking and running. For these children, mobility is a challenge. Not only does it impact their daily function, but it also impacts their ability to engage and participate in gross motor play with their friends and family. Working with our physiotherapists, children learn to optimize their movement and gross motor abilities to maximize their participation in areas that are important to them and their families. Physiotherapists work collaboratively with families/youth on learning strategies that maximize their function to develop increased independence outside of therapy sessions.

Types of Challenges, Therapies & Goals:

  • Addressing muscle difficulties related to limited movement/ strength/endurance
  • "Physical" difficulties resulting in poor balance & co-ordination (i.e. lack of trunk control versus lack of attending to the environment).


Social Worker

When a family receives the news that their child has special needs, often they don’t know what to do next or where to start. KidsAbility’s Social Workers come alongside the family to offer support and help in navigating this new world. Whether it’s providing counselling, behaviour and emotional support, transition planning or advocacy, our social workers are there every step of the way when families need them most.

Types of Challenges, Therapies & Goals:

  • Service navigation
  • Counselling
  • Support finding funding options
  • Community support
  • Advocacy 


Speech and Language Therapist

When a child has a communication challenge, it can have a negative impact on their self-esteem, behaviour and ability to be successful in school. KidsAbility’s Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) work with families to build their child’s communication skills. SLPs help children learn to engage, interact and play with their family and friends, to communicate with words, signs, gestures or specialized communication devices. SLPs also help children with communication challenges such as stuttering, pronouncing sounds, feeding and swallowing and by building literacy skills. Working with families to first identify what the challenge is, through one-on-one, group or coaching support, each child and family is given strategies and support to help them overcome the challenge.

Types of Challenges, Therapies & Goals:

  • Language delays
  • Speech difficulties
  • Social interactions
  • Play skills
  • Augmentative Communication Services
  • Stuttering
  • Feeding and swallowing
  • Literacy